Category: Bronchial Hyperresponsiveness

Bronchial Hyperresponsiveness After Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: Discussion

Patients with transection of the cervical spine (quadriplegia) manifest a unique situation of selective interruption of sympathetic pulmonary innervation with retained intact parasympathetic tone. Although human airways seem to lack tonic sympathetic bronchodilator tone,” it is believed that sympathetic nerves in the lung serve in a neuromodulatory capacity, acting to counteract cholinergic bronchoconstrictor effect. Such…

Bronchial Hyperresponsiveness After Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: Results

Baseline spirometry revealed no evidence of obstruction (Table 1). All patients demonstrated hyperresponsiveness to methacholine (Table 2). Values of FEVi and FVC at baseline and after provocation were 3.06 ±0.61 (SD) L vs 1.91 ±0.60 L (p=0.002), and 3.46 ±0.75 L vs 2.73 ±0.69 L (p=0.062), respectively. Percentage predicted values for FEVi and FVC before…

Bronchial Hyperresponsiveness After Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: Methods

Eight male outpatients with traumatic lesions of the cervical spinal cord (level of injury, C4-7) underwent bronchoprovocation testing with methacholine (Provocholine, Roche Laboratories, Nutley, NJ). Time elapsed since spinal cord injury ranged from 3 to 23 years. Mean age was 34.5 ±5.8 (SD) years (Table 1). None of the subjects had ever been cigarette smokers,…

Bronchial Hyperresponsiveness After Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

The degree of pulmonary dysfunction following spinal cord injury is dependent upon the level of injury sustained. Lesions above the third cervical segment result in complete paralysis of all muscles of respiration and therefore necessitate mechanical ventilation, whereas lesions at lower cervical levels will, to varying extents, spare the major muscles of inspiration, ie, the…