Category: Laryngomalacia

Diagnosis of Laryngomalacia by Fiberoptic Endoscopy: Results

The mean age for patients in the study group was 4.9 months (55% male patients), and for the control subjects it was 4.4 months (52% male subjects). No procedure-related complications occurred. All patients were discharged from the hospital promptly after undergoing the WT, and 1.5 to 4.5 h after undergoing the DAT (median time, 2.1…

Diagnosis of Laryngomalacia by Fiberoptic Endoscopy: Data and Statistical Analysis

An additional 25 video recordings from infants with normal upper airways who underwent laryngoscopies (WT, 12 recordings; DAT, 13 recordings) for reasons unrelated to upper airways problems were also copied to the new video cassettes and served as healthy control subjects. The causes for performing FFL in these cases were nocturnal snoring, following adenoidectomy, chronic…

Diagnosis of Laryngomalacia by Fiberoptic Endoscopy: Clinical Scoring

The laryngoscopy performed using the WT was performed with the infant held awake in a sitting position by a parent. Topical anesthesia (lidocaine 1% and phenylephrine 0.25%) was applied to the nose, and FFL was performed to the level of the vocal cords. In the DAT, each infant received anesthesia with IV propofol. A dose…

Diagnosis of Laryngomalacia by Fiberoptic Endoscopy

Laryngomalacia is the most common cause of congenital stridor. It is usually a benign disorder resolving spontaneously by 12 to 18 months of age. The diagnosis of laryngomalacia requires dynamic visualization of the glottic and supraglottic area. Since the introduction of video-recorded fiberoptic flexible laryngoscopy (FFL), the following two approaches have emerged for the endoscopic…