Effect of Disodium Cromoglycate on Ventilation and Gas Exchange During Exercise in Asthmatic Children With a Postexertion FEVi Fall Less Than 15 Percent

Aug-18-2014

Effect of Disodium Cromoglycate on Ventilation and Gas Exchange During Exercise in Asthmatic Children With a Postexertion FEVi Fall Less Than 15 PercentPhysical activity in children with asthma is generally encouraged and can be accomplished safely after pretreatment with inhaled drugs. An exercise bronchoprovocation test usually is utilized to evaluate the ability and safety for asthmatic children to engage in a physical exercise. This evaluation, however, does not reveal the consequences of disease on metabolic function when the organism is physiologically stressed, as during exercise. Studies on work capacity in asthma have shown controversial results.” Metabolic changes during exercise have not been systematically evaluated in asthmatic children, and little information is available on dynamic response of ventilation and gas exchange to exercise in this disease.”
In a previous study on gas exchange response to exercise in children with exercise-induced asthma (EIA [mean postexercise fall in FEVi of 33 percent]), we observed that preexercise inhaled disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) and salbutamol resulted in reduced ventilation and energy cost (EC) of running during exercise. Anti allergy medicine Click Here In an attempt to investigate whether the higher level of ventilation and EC of exercise in unpremedicated asthmatic subjects is necessarily related to a greater airway obstruction after exercise, we studied the ventilatory response to exercise in asthmatic children who do not develop a significant bronchoconstriction at the end of a standard exercise.
The purpose of this study is, therefore, to evaluate the effect of premedication with DSCG on ventilation and gas exchange during the treadmill exercise test in asthmatic children who show a FEVi fall lower than 15 percent after an exercise performed without treatment. Asthmatic children—The study was carried out with 17 children (10 males, 7 females) with bronchial asthma, aged 8.3 to 14.3 (11.3 ±1.9 [SD]) years. They were recruited from patients attending the outpatient clinic at the Department of Pediatrics, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. In order to investigate subjects without a significant fall in FEV i after exercise, we considered as a suitable limit the cutoff of 15 percent postexercise fall in FEVi, which is generally accepted to define El A.’ To meet these criteria, each child performed a standard exercise test in our laboratory before entering the study protocol.